Extractions

 

Dental Extraction is a removal of a tooth from the mouth. It is performed for a wide variety of reasons. Your dentist will examine your tooth and explain the reasons why your tooth needs to be extracted, an x-ray will be taken to help plan the best way to remove the tooth.

When does a tooth need to be extracted?

 

A tooth may need to be extracted for a number of reasons:

 

  • Tooth decay – If the decay is severely advanced and the nerves and blood vessels in the tooth have been infected, and are unsuitable for root canal treatment.

  • Impacted wisdom teeth – Sometimes our mouths are simply not big enough to accommodate these teeth. The teeth become impacted (stuck), this can cause infection and pain.

  • Orthodontics (braces) – Teeth can erupt in many different positions, if this happens you may have to have teeth extracted so your other teeth can be brought into line.

  • Periodontal disease - Bacterial infection under the gum damages the tissue which connects the tooth to the gum; as the disease progresses, the bone anchoring the tooth to the jaw begins to dissolve, resulting in the tooth becoming loose.

  • Teeth that have been damaged by trauma.

  • Certain medical conditions  may require teeth to be extracted.

Post extraction care

 

After the extraction a blood clot will form in the socket were the tooth used to be, this is NOT to be disturbed by vigorous rinsing or poking the site with your tongue or finger as it is a very important part of the healing process.

 

If the socket does start to bleed after you have left the dental practice, place a clean tissue or handkerchief over the extraction site and apply pressure by  biting down, the bleeding will normally stop within a few minutes. Again do NOT disturb the blood clot. If the bleeding does persist please contact your dentist for further advice.

Your mouth will still be numb for an hour or so after the local anaesthetic, please take care not to bite your cheek or tongue or burn your mouth when drinking hot liquids. Avoid Smoking and Alcohol for 24 hours as these can have an effect on the healing process

 

You may be in discomfort after the anaesthetic has worn off,  take a household painkiller (headache tablet) following the manufacture's instructions. Do NOT take Aspirin as this may cause the socket to bleed.